Book of Remembrance
Lost Soldiers of the Great War

Poppy

Lest we forget...

Through newspaper requests, the Committee hoped to gather the names of all of the local citizens who served overseas, listing them in the first pages of the book, but some were missed. The families of those who gave their lives were asked to contribute a biography and photograph (the original photos hang in the Town Hall), but in some cases only a name is shown. There are also soldiers' names inscribed on the Cenotaph who weren't included in the book.

To enlarge a picture, hover your mouse over it or tap the picture.

Guy Ambrose
Evening Guide: 05 Apr 1919
John Guy Cluxton Ambrose (2341377) was born 11 June 1880, son of Thomas and Ada (Cluxton) of Port Hope. A musician, he enlisted in Montreal 14 May 1917, arriving at Liverpool 05 July 1917.
A gunner with the Canadian Garrison Unit, 4th Siege Battery, 2nd Brigade, he died of pneumonia resulting from influenza at the 46th Canadian Hospital, France, 25 February 1919 and is buried in Halle Communal Cemetery, Belgium.
There is no mention of him on the Cenotaph nor in the Book of Remembrance.
Charles Anderson
Courtesy of The Varsity, University of Toronto, 1918
Charles Laidlaw Anderson (475533), son of Thomas and Mary Jane (Cromie), was born 20 September 1896 in Port Hope.
He enlisted with the 4th Universities Company, PPCLI, in Kingston 11 September 1915, arriving in France 26 March 1916.
He was killed in action 01 June 1916 at Sanctuary Wood, Ypres, and is buried in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground, Belgium.
Charles' name is neither on the Cenotaph nor in the Book of Remembrance.
Circumstance of death
Evening Guide: 27 Jan 1917
No photograph available Leonard Reginald Barham (805175) was born 01 February 1897 in London, England. He arrived, a Barnardo boy, in Portland, Maine, 05 March 1907. His next-of-kin was foster mother (Mrs.) Emma Austin of Paddock, England.
An unmarried farmer employed by George Raby of Hope Township, he joined the 136th Battalion in Port Hope 05 January 1916, disembarking in Le Havre, France, 15 November.
He was killed in action 01 January 1917 and is buried in Ecoivres Military Cemetery.
His name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph but not in the Book of Remembrance.
Newspaper death notice
Evening Guide: 27 Jan 1917
James and Gladys Baxter Top photo
James and Gladys (Davis) Baxter
Bottom photo
James on the right, a fellow soldier on the left.
(Photographs courtesy of James' daughter, Irene.]
James Baxter (3056818), the son of James and Grace Caroline (Harris), was born 14 January 1884 in Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England.
A machinist living in Port Hope with his mother, he was conscripted in Kingston 22 February 1918 and saw service overseas in Belgium, France, and Germany with the 5th Battery, CFA.
James married his war-bride, Gladys Davis, 03 April 1919 in England, returned to Canada shortly after, and had three children - Irene, Arthur, and Lorne.
At the time of his death in 1936, he was employed at Nicholson File in Port Hope and is buried in Union Cemetery with his wife and two sons.
While his younger brother, Henry, who died of pneumonia and pleurisy at age 33 in 1933, was mentioned in the Book of Remembrance, James was not.
James Baxter
Loren Bee
Courtesy of David Bee, grand-nephew
Loren Sidney Bee (80512), the son of Sidney and Martha Minerva (Young), was born 02 November 1897 at Wesleyville.
An unmarried railroad man, he enlisted in Port Hope with the 136th Battalion 28 December 1915. His military venture ended with his discharge at Valcartier Camp 12 July 1916, due to a request by his widowed mother, as he was needed to run the farm following the death of his father three weeks previously.
He married Vera Viola Brown 16 June 1926 at Port Hope. He passed away 21 June 1935 of leukemia at the age of 37.
Loren's name was not included in the Book of Remembrance.
Charles Bell
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Charles William Henry Bell (192444), the son of Charles and Julia (Richardson), was born 26 March 1893 at Salford Lanes in Lancashire, England.
He enlisted in Toronto (5'4", 106 pounds!) with the 92nd Highlanders 18 August 1915. He arrived in France 28 August 1916, was reported wounded and MIA at Rouen 26 September and confirmed killed the same day. He is buried in Courcelette British Cemetery.
Charles' name is on the Cenotaph but not in the Book of Remembrance.
No photograph available George William Bell (412546) was born in 1896, the eldest child of William Mordey and Marion Annie (Cook), in Sunderland, England, arriving in Canada around 1911. He was an unmarried farmer prior to his 27 February 1915 enlistment in Port Hope. He listed as next-of-kin his brother, Norman, "address unknown", but in his Will, sister Dorothy Bell of England.
He met his death in action at 12:30PM on 17 February 1917 and is buried at Ecoivres Military Cemetery, France. While his name is on the Cenotaph and in the Book of Remembrance, there was no biography or photograph supplied to the Committee.
Newspaper death notice
Evening Guide: 26 May 1917
John Samuel Brown
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
John Samuel Brown (32783), second son of William Holmes & Fannie Louisa (Banks), was born 16 November 1890 in Port Hope.
A 3rd-year medical student at McGill University, he enlisted at Valcartier 24 September 1914 and was taken on strength with the No. 1 Field Ambulance in France. He was promoted to Staff Sergeant 21 April 1916. He was transferred to the 61st Battery, RGA with the rank of Second Lieutenant.
John was killed in action at Arras 18 May 1917 and is buried in Tilloy British Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais, France. His name is not on the Cenotaph nor in the Book of Remembrance.
John's death notice
McGill Daily: 01 Oct 1917
No photograph available James Donnachie Campbell (814135), the son of James and Mary, was born 17 February 1898 in Deagles, Ayrshire, Scotland. The family emigrated to Cobourg in 1910.
A sectionmaster for the Grand Trunk Railway, he enlisted at Cobourg in the 139th Overseas Battalion 01 January 1916 and arrived at Liverpool 09 October.
When his battalion, the 21st, was advancing on the Sensee River on the Drocourt-Queant Line, he was killed in action 27 August 1918. He is buried in Windmill British Cemetery at Monchy Le Preux, France.
His name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph but not in the Book of Remembrance.
James Campbell's Will
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Thomas Leroy Chambers
Courtesy of Jan Robertson (Ancestry.ca)
Thomas Leroy Chambers (91616), son of James Edward and Eva Charlotte (Cann), was born 03 June 1897 in Hope Township.
A single pattern maker, he enlisted at Niagara 18 August 1915, and served in Canada, England, and France, being awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. A gunner with the 31st Battery, CFA, he “died in France on 08 May 1917 [No. 6 Casualty Clearing Station] as the result of wounds received during combat while serving with the 8th Brigade, CFA. His remain are buried in Barlin Cemetery, France.”
While Thomas’ name appears on a plaque at Canton School: “In Memory of pupils of SS#8, Hope Township, who fell in the Great War, 1914-1918”, there is no mention of him in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
Western Union telegram KIA
Courtesy of Jan Robertson (Ancestry.ca)
No photograph available Clarence Richard Clarke (195049), the fourth son of William and Emily (Gilbury), was born in Port Hope 07 October 1897. A file maker, he enlisted 31 Dec 1916 with the 207th Battalion in Ottawa. He was sent to England 14 June 1917 and to France 11 November, where he saw service as a stretcher bearer, suffering shrapnel and gunshot wounds on at least three occasions in 1918. He was discharged 11 March 1919.
On his return to Canada, he married Alma Beckwith 01 May 1919 in Toronto. He died 14 August 1931 of tuberculosis.
His name is inscribed on the Cenotaph but not included in the Book of Remembrance.
Clarence Clarke
Evening Guide: 14 Dec 1917
No photograph available Robert Charles Cooke (3056208), the son of Edward Charles and Emily (Bales), was born 28 December 1897 in Hoxton, Hackney, England. A farmer, he was conscripted in Estevan, Saskatchewan, 07 November 1917, arrived in England 04 March 1918, and was posted to the 21st Overseas Battalion.
Shortly after joining his unit in France, he was killed in action 19 September 1918. The War Graves Registers read: "Was on duty at his Company's Headquarters, doing sentry, and during hostile artillery retaliation, shell burst immediately in front of him, killing him instantly." He is buried in Dominion British Cemetery at Nord Pas de Calais.
While his name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph (as Cook), he was not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Robert Cook's Will
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
No photograph available Charles Lorne Croft (805456), son of John and Rosetta May (Byam), was born 07 August 1898 in Port Hope. His brother, Wilbert, also served. An unmarried cleaner and presser at the File Factory, he enlisted 29 February 1916 in Port Hope with the 136th OS Battalion.
He arrived in England 16 October 1916 and was taken on strength with the 64th Battalion, but was plagued with ear problems from the start. On 24 January 1917, he was admitted to the Netley Military Hospital where he received the first of two mastoid operations. Due to chronic otitis, he was declared medically unfit to serve and on 17 September, was dispatched to Canada, his “…services being no longer required.”
Charles married Winnifred Marie Jiggins of Port Hope in Pickering 25 January 1936. They had one child. He died 29 August 1956 and is buried in Port Hope’s St. John’s Anglican Cemetery with his wife, who passed away in 1977. He is mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
While unable to provide a military photograph, we are fortunate to have a c1903 family photo.
No photograph available Wilbert Carlton Croft (805556), the son of John and Rosetta May (Byam), was born 14 October 1896 in Port Hope.
A 5'8", 111-pound express driver, he enlisted with the 136th Overseas Battalion at Port Hope 15 March 1916, claiming two years previous military involvement with the High School Cadets. He was discharged 30 June 1916 - after two weeks of hospitalization at Port Hope for tuberculosis - at Barriefield Camp as physically unfit.
He was recommended for further treatment and admitted to the Mowat Sanatorium at Portsmouth, Ontario, in 19118, suffering from "far advanced pulmonary and laryngeal tuberculosis". He passed away 28 October 1918 and is buried at Welcome Cemetery in Port Hope.
His name is found in the Book of Remembrance but not on the Cenotaph. While unable to provide a military photograph, we are fortunate to have a c1903 family photo.
Death notice
Evening Guide: 29 Oct 1918
Howard Elliott
Evening Guide: 04 Sep 1918
Howard Leslie Elliott, Sergeant, the only son of Rev. Charles Henry and Julia Ann (Bradley), was born 27 December 1890 in Fern Glen, Ontario. On 30 September 1914, he married Rosa Berdina White at Elizabethville. Their only child, Elmer Leslie, was born 16 March 1916 in the same village. Six weekes later, on 01 June, Howard enlisted with the 187th Overseas Battalion at Whitby.
He arrived France 17 February 1918, where he was killed in action 14 August 1918. His Circumstances of Death record states: "Whilst doing trench duty in a newly captured position in the vicinity of Parvillers at about 10:30 s.m. August 14th, 1918, he was struck in the back of the head by shrapnel from an enemy shell and instantly killed." He is buried in Bouchoir British Cemetery, five miles northeast of Roye, France.
His name was not included in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
Elliott's death notice
Evening Guide: 04 Sep 1918
Rev. James Elliott
Courtesy of St. John's Anglican Church. Port Hope
James Alfred Elliott, Captain. Eighth of nine children of Hugh & Mary Ann (Hannah), was born 20 April 1864 in Pontiac, Quebec. He was a Rector in Cowansville when he married Sarah Charlotte Smardon 09 Jan 1896 in Trois-Rivieres, Quebec. Rector of St. John’s Anglican Church in Port Hope since 1912, he enlisted as Chaplain to the 136th Battalion at Port Hope 30 May 1916.
A long-time sufferer of heart disease, he was discharged 22 Sep 1916 after a Medical Board review. In 1919, he headed the committee that produced the local Book of Remembrance, and passed away 20 October 1925 in Port Hope. James, Sarah, and their unmarried daughter, Alfreda Charlotte, are buried in St. John’s Cemetery.
He did not include himself in the Book of Remembrance.
Richard James Gibbs
Courtesy of the Silver Cross Women of Canada, Oshawa Branch
Richard James Gibbs (805057), son of Richard & Agnes (Botley), was born in Kent, England, 12 December 1897. The family appears to have emigrated to Canada in 1883, settling in Whitby by 1901. He married Irene Read 09 June 1909 in Oshawa.
He enlisted with the 136th Overseas Battalion at Port Hope 13 November 1915 with a Port Hope address. The "Particulars of Family" record in his military file, dated 31 August 1916, show him with two sons and two daughters ranging in age from 17 months to 8 years. His wife had relocated in Oshawa by that time.
Richard arrived in France 15 February 1917. Three months later, on 06 May, he died at the No. 23 Casualty Clearing Station of “dangerous wounds” received in action and was buried at Lapugnoy Military Cemetery near Bethune, France. While his name appears in the Book of Remembrance, he was not listed on the Port Hope Cenotaph.
Gibbs' death notice
Evening Guide: 14 May 1917
No photographs available Gibson -
As only the surname was listed in the Book of Remembrance, he is likely one of the two following brothers or cousins (a Frank Gibson is listed as Harry's next-of-kin on his attestation papers) born in Port Hope in the mid-1860s.
Frank S. Gibson (126302) was born in Port Hope, according to his attestation papers, 13 June 1892, yet Frank stated that he had previously served in the York Rangers in the Riel Rebellion of 1885. A medical report in his military file reads: "He went to France on 08 June 1916 as a Pte. which duty he carried out in England from 16 April 1916. After leaving Base his O.C. put him in the transport lines where he did duty until 28 June 1916. He never was on sick parade since he enlisted. Says he told recruiting officer he was not sure of his age so that officer put it down and he is not sure what it was. He admits he might be 50 yrs. He was in the 1885 Rebellion (NW)". His next-of-kin was his wife, Annie.
Frank served in France for six weeks with the 42nd Battalion before being discharged due to age in Quebec 15 February 1917. "This man is too old. He looks his age and feels it. No other evidence of disability. All systems normal."
His file bears the notation: "Deceased 26 December 1952". No further information has been found.
Harry Gibson (219828) was born in Port Hope 26 May 1870. A sailor claiming previous service with the 46th Regiment (Boer War?), he enlisted 25 September 1915 at Port Hope. He was transferred to the 80th Battalion on 01 October and discharged at Kingston as "medically unfit for service" on 05 October 1915. Death date and burial site are unknown.
No photograph available Samuel Glanville (805063), the son of Samuel George and Louisa Elizabeth (Mercer), was born 24 September 1895 in Clarke Township. He married Mary Jane Ball 21 December 1915 at Orono.
He enlisted with the 136th Overseas Battalion at Port Hope 05 January 1916 and arrived at Liverpool, England, 06 October, and France 15 November. He was reported missing in action 01 March 1917. His name is inscribed on the Vimy Memorial.
While included in the Book of Remembrance, his name was not inscribed on the Cenotaph.
Glanville obituary
Alfred Harrigan
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Alfred Benley Harrigan (27717), second son of William Samuel & Evelyn (Wilkinson), was born 06 September 1898 in Port Hope. A steamfitter, he enlisted 20 September 1914 with the 46th Highlanders of Toronto and was sent to Valcartier. Fighting with the 15th Battalion, he was lost without a trace on the Ypres Salient 24-29 April 1915 and declared killed in action 29 April.
Alfred isn’t mentioned in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
No photograph available Howard Samuel Hewson (141932), presumed son of Charles & Mary Ann (Burke) of Port Hope,was born 17 November 1882. By 1891, the family had moved to Toronto. His wife, Clara, was living in Chicago at his 09 August 1915 enlistment with the 75th Battalion at Niagara. Details of this have proven elusive, added to the October 1916 claim in his Separation Allowance file: "Issue no further cheques. This woman is not his legal wife."
Howard sailed from Halifax 23 April 1916 on the Empress of Britain. His military career was cut short with his field death at the #3 Casualty Clearing Station 17 September 1916 in France from shrapnel wounds to his left shoulder and thigh. He was buried in Puchevillers British Cemetery.
There is no mention of him in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
Alexander Jenkins Alexander Jenkins (454796), the son of William Thomas and Mary Ann (Lee), was born 07 June 1887 in Port Hope. On 10 December 1910, he married Alice Barton McDonald in Toronto.
A sheet metal worker, he enlisted 22 May 1915 in Lindsay and sailed from Halifax 04 January 1916. He landed in France 18 July.
His military file lists a number of times he was reported for offences, including being "awarded 7 days of Field Punishment No. 1 for absenting himself from 2pm parade", which consisted of the convicted man being placed in restraints and attached to a fixed object, such as a gun wheel or a fence post, for up to two hours per day. He also suffered a number of gunshot and shrapnel wounds.
He died in action with the 5th Canadian Mounted Rifles 26 August 1918 and is buried in Orange Hill Cemetery, Nord Pas de Calais, France.
While his name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph, he was not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Jenkins death notice
Images courtesy The Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Thomas Kerr
(in his Boer War uniform)
Credit: Cal Clayton Collection

Thomas Kerr
Courtesy of The Evening Guide
Thomas Kerr (805092), the son of Thomas and Margaret Ann (Craig), was born 26 September 1870 in Port Hope. He and a group of friends joined D battery, Royal Canadian Field Artillery, in Ottawa 05 January 1900 as it was about to leave for South Africa. Having served with the 46th Regiment, he returned home in 1902.
He was one of the first to enlist with the 136th Overseas Battalion 27 December 1915 in Port Hope. His military record has little to offer, save an investigation into his death, after going AWOL from Kingston, at his home. The conclusion of the Board of Inquiry at Barriefield 14 June 1916: "The Board having assembled persuant to order, proceed to investigate the cause of death and find that Pte. Thomas Kerr, 136th O.S. Batt'n, C.E.F., died a few minutes after being taken to Port Hope Hospital, Port Hope, Ontario, on May 26th, 1916, from the effect of a dose of Crude Carbolic Acid administered by his own hand while in a stage of depression due to influence of Alcoholism notwithstanding the fact he was on the prohibited list."
He is buried in Union Cemetery. His name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph, but he was not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Death announcement
Evening Guide: 27 May 1916
Walter Kirkconnell
Credit: Sept 2010 YPBC News
Walter Allison Kirkconnell, Lieutenant, son of Thomas Allison & Bertha Gertrude (Watson), was born 20 August 1893 in Port Hope. He attended Port Hope High School and at his 22 September 1914 enlistment was a law student. While serving with the Quebec Regiment in France, he was plagued with gastro-enteritis.
He was killed in action: “While taking part in an attack at Morgemont Wood on the morning of the August 8th, 1918, he was instantly killed near the ‘jumping-off’ position by some enemy shell fire.” He was buried in Toronto British Cemetery, south of Corbie, France, and is commemorated at the family plot in Port Hope Union Cemetery.
Walter isn’t mentioned in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
War Diary entry
No photograph available Sydney Arthur Martin (3060928), was born 03 June 1885, fourth of five children of James and Cemerimus (Bebee) at Port Hope. An unmarried farmer, he was drafted with the 1st Depot Battalion, Eastern Ontario Regiment, 18 October 1918 at Belleville. Sadly, he died four days later, 22 Oct 1918, at Belleville General Hospital of heart failure due to influenza and pneumonia and was buried in Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough.
While Sidney’s name appears on a plaque at Canton School: “In Memory of pupils of SS#8, Hope Township, who fell in the Great War, 1914-1918”, there is no mention of him in the Book of Remembrance.
Martin's COD
Image courtesy Library and Archives Canada
Harry Mason
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Henry (Harry) Denver Mason (Lieutenant), the son of William E. and Agnes Jane (Finnie) of Canton, was born 22 June 1892 in Denver, Colorado. A banker, he enlisted with the 80th Battalion 06 September 1915 in Barriefield, becoming a Lieutenant 01 November.
In France, he was attached to the Royal Flying Corps as an observer 02 April 1917. He was killed in action 28 April 1917 and is buried in Bruay Communal Cemetery. While his name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph and on a plaque at Canton School: “In Memory of pupils of SS#8, Hope Township, who fell in the Great War, 1914-1918”, he was not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Harry's death
Evening Guide: 30 May 1917
Alfred McAllister
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Alfred Wallace McAllister (475489), son of Robert J. (born Port Hope) & Nellie (Wood) 26 December 1890 in Blackstock, Ontario.
A Toronto letter carrier, he enlisted with the 4th Overseas University Company 09 October 1915 in Toronto, arriving in England 07 December 1915. He proceeded to France 24 March 1916 and was killed in action while fighting with the P.P.C.L.I. 02 June 1916 at Sanctuary Wood: “…was killed by enemy shell fire while in the trenches about 11.00 A.M. on June 2nd, 1916.”
His name is inscribed on the Menin Gate, Ypres, and is also commemorated in Welcome Cemetery, Port Hope, where his parents and other family members are buried.
Alfred was neither mentioned in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
No photograph available Archibald James Mearns (42539), born 20 May 1884 in London, England, was, according to the marriage registration of his union with Reta Ethel Hughes of California 12 August 1907 in Toronto, the son of A. James Mearns and Lucy Clarke. He emigrated from Liverpool with a group of 180 Barnardo Home children 08 October 1896, arriving at Quebec City ten days later. He was placed with the Samuel Wauchope family in Bolton, Ontario.
A mechanic, he enlisted with the 9th Battery, 3rd Brigade, Canadian Field Artillery, 22 September 1914 at Valcartier, Quebec, with eight years previous service with the Battery. He stated that he was unmarried, with his sister, Mrs. James Carr, of Toronto as next-of-kin. His army medical file describes a tattoo of his wife's name, Ethel Mearns, two clasped hands over a heart, and the marriage date, so perhaps Ethel had died or left him prior to his enlistment. His stated adress as of 11 February 1915 was Box 134, Port Hope.
A 21 January 1917 file entry states "past marriage was approved" - there is a London marriage record of Archibald J. Mearns and Alice Powell in the last quarter of 1915 - and his Will of 1917 leaves "everything to my wife, Mrs. Alice Mearns". Perhaps he married Alice in while on leave in England.
Archibald served as a gunner in France from 07 March 1916 to 13 December 1918, when he returned permanently to England. Due to a combination of myalgia, chronic bronchitis, and varicose veins, he was discharged 07 Mar 1919 "following injury and exposure in France" as medically unfit to serve. Alice appears to have remained in London. In the 1921 Port Hope census, he was listed as a widower, living with his brother-in-law, James Carr, and sister, Rose Alice (Noble) at 259 Brown Street.
He received treatment over the next years at the Christie Street Veterans' Hospital, and it was during a stay there that he met the Prince of Wales during his 1927 Canada tour. He died of tuberculosis 11 June 1941 at the "Toronto Hospital" and is buried in Prospect Cemetery. He is not listed in the Book of Remembrance.
Royal meeting
Evening Guide: 11 Aug 1927
No photograph available Joseph Harold Middlebrook (193594), one of five children of Joseph Harper and Emma (Kirkland), was born 17 November 1887 in Port Hope. By 1891, the family was living in Toronto.
Joseph enlisted, an unmarried electrician, in Toronto 10 April 1916. He served in England and France before being discharged from the 92nd Battalion, COEF, 05 June 1918 as "being wounded and rendered physically unfit for further war service" after suffering a gunshot wound "to the upper extremities".
On 28 July 1932, Joseph married Edna Kennedy in Toronto. He passed 01 March 1954. There is no mention of him in the Book of Remembrance.
No photograph available Thomas William Mouser (3059882), one of seven children of George and Eliza (Earl), was born in Bristol, England, 16 June 1896. By 1901, he was living in the Aston Union Cottage Homes in Erdington, a complex for orphaned and destitute children.
He emigrated with a Barnardo party in 1911. At the time of his 13 Oct 1917 enlistment with the 1st Depot Battalion (Eastern Ontario) Canadian Infantry, he was working on the Hope Township farm of Richard Uglow.
Enroute to England on the SS Thongwa, he died of double lobar pneumonia 18 July 1918 and was buried at sea. With no family, he left his wordly goods to Richard Uglow. His name is inscribed on the Halifax Memorial.
While his name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph, he was not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Thomas' death notice
Evening Guide: 29 Jul 1918
Harold Neal
From the Leona Croft collection
Source - Marika Pirie"
Harold Baker Neal (3038346), the youngest of four children of Elisha and Eliza Jane (Heaslip), was born 04 March 1892 in Port Hope.
An unmarried divinity student, he was drafted in Toronto 15 May 1918 with the 1st Central Ontario Regiment, 1st Depot Battalion. He was discharged from the University of Toronto OS Company 19 November 1918 “…by reason of having been accepted as a candidate for a commission in the Imperial Army.”
He married Esther Caroline Bailey, daughter of James and Almeda (Snarr) of Rawdon, Hastings County, 11 August 1920 in Vancouver. They had two children: Gwendoyn Anna (1922) and John Edgar (1925). C1920, they were living in Toronto and by 1931, they were in Belleville.
Harold died 07 January 1972 and is buried in Port Hope Union Cemetery with his wife. He is not mentioned in the Book of Remembrance.
Lewis Peverelle
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Lewis Shambourg Peverelle (59796), the son of Lewis and Julia, was born in Toronto 26 April 1893. A member of the 21st Battalion, Canadian Infantry, he enlisted 06 November 1914 in Kingston and sailed from Montreal 06 May 1915, arriving in England 15 May. His unit disembarked at Boulogne, France, 14 September 1915. He was killed in action 24 June 1916 and is buried in Bedford House Cemetery, Belgium.
While his name is shown in the Book of Remembrance and inscribed on the Cenotaph, nothing was supplied by the family to the Committee.
Lewis Peverelle death notice
Image courtesy of the Toronto Star
No photograph available William Ernest Pomfret (412625) was born in Preston, England, 25 June 1886, the son of James and Mary (Bunning). He and his wife, Mary Sandham, emigrated to America in 1913.
A carpenter, William enlisted at Port Hope 13 February 1915. His military record contains a signed permission note from his wife, and he sailed to England 24 June 1915. A medical examination dated 15 June 1916 at Shorncliffe, England, notes: "Has been doing Orderly Room work. Soft and Flabby - needs training". At 5'6", he weighed 135 pounds!
His service was in England and he was demobilized with the rank of Sergeant at Kingston 08 April 1919.
He died from tuberculosis 01 March 1923 at the Mowat Sanitarium in Portsmouth, Ontario. His military record states: "Death due to service". He is buried in Port Hope's Union Cemetery.
While William's name appears in the Book of Remembrance and is inscribed on the Cenotaph, nothing was supplied by his family to the Committee.

William's permission to enlist
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
William's death notice
Evening Guide: 05 Mar 1923
Alfred Prout
Posted by "jandrews961" on Ancestry.ca
Alfred Thomas Prout (455143), the son of John and Harriet (Proctor), was born 16 November 1893 at Ivybridge, Devon. The family emigrated to Canada in 1911.
Alfred enlisted first at Port Hope 28 July 1915, serving in Canada and England for 18 months and France for 36 months. During that time, he married Edith Maude Bennett 18 September 1915 in England.
Discharged in April 1919, he returned to Canada and rejoined at Cobourg 01 September. Back in England, he died at 6:10AM 20 September 1919 in Sydenham Military Hospital of "general septicaemia, influenza type". He is buried in Cobourg Cemetery. While Alfred's name appears on the Cenotaph and in the Book of Remembrance, nothing was supplied by his family to the Committee.
No photograph available Frank Punchke (805568) was born in Bessarabia, Russia, 02 May 1877, the son of Sofia. The “Particulars of Family”, dated 20 July 1916, show that his wife, Maria, was living in Discopse, Russia, and that he had two daughters, aged 8 and 12 (presumably also in Russia). He joined the 136th Overseas Battalion at Port Hope 08 Mar 1916, claiming previous military service of 3 years in the Russian Army. He embarked for England 25 August 1916, proceeded to France 01 February 1917, returned to England 12 April 1917, and returned to Canada 15 August 1917. He was awarded the Russian Cross of St. George, 4th class, 14 January 1918 for “Distinguished Conduct in the Field”.
At Vimy Ridge, Frank received a gunshot wound to the left shoulder, fractured left humerus, and a shrapnel wound to the left temple, the latter injury appearing to have led to a diagnosis of insanity. According to his medical record, dated 23 January 1918: “This patient has self-centred delusions: he imagines his blood vessels are ruptured and that he has many and varied diseases and complaints. He apparently has hallucinations of touch; complains of headaches and dizziness. Judgment and insight poor.” He was admitted to Newmarket Military Hospital 02 March 1918 as a likely-incurable mental patient. He was struck off strength at Toronto 23 March 1918, “in consequence of Medical Unfitness”.
In the 1921 Ontario census returns, Frank was listed as a patient in Westminster Psychopathic Hospital, built in 1918 to treat and rehabilitate veterans with psychological injuries and shell shock.
He died 11 October 1928 and is buried in Winnipeg’s Brookside Cemetery. His name was not included in the Book of Remembrance.
Russian Cross award
Evening Guide: 21 Mar 1918
Arthur Raby
Courtesy of the Canadian Virtual War Memorial
Arthur George William Raby (26177) was born 11 August 1891 at Kettering, England, the son of George William Smith and Kathleen (Lumber). The family emigrated to Port Hope around 1911.
Prior to enlisting at Valcartier, Quebec, 22 September 1914, he had spent three years with the Royal Canadian Rifles.
On three occasions in April and May, 1915, while attached to the 14th Battalion, he suffered gunshot wounds to his legs. On 03 June 1916, he was reported missing in action, but later was reported to have been killed at Rouen on that date.
His military file reads: "He was killed whilst taking part in an attack at Mount Sorrel". Arthur's name is inscribed on the Menin Gate, Ypres.
While his name appears on the Port Hope Cenotaph, he was not mentioned in the
Book of Remembrance.
Arthur's Will
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
Elmore Russell Randall
Courtesy of nephew Richard Randall
Elmore Russell Randall (2001076), eighth of nine children of Ralph Joseph & Margaret Ellen (Stevenson), was born 18 February 1898 in Port Hope before moving to Cobourg. He enlisted in the Cobourg Heavy Battery 22 September 1917. He was the sole survivor of four men working in an ammunition hut in Belgium, when hit by enemy fire 28 March 1918. He was taken to hospital with a GSW to the abdomen, but died of his wounds two days later. He is buried in Etaples Cemetery.
He was neither mentioned in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
No photograph available Alfred Rosser (412630) was born 29 September 1876 in Bedminster, Bristol, England.
Prior to his enlistment 23 February 1915 at Port Hope, he was a labourer married to Lydia Beatrice Daniels of Port Hope. He enlisted 23 February 1915 in Port Hope and was shipped overseas 24 June 1915. He was promoted to sergeant in the field 21 April 1917.
Alfred was transferred to England 05 August 1918 as "being over 50 years of age and considered not fully capable of carrying on with duties in the field - posted to Canadian General Depot at Shorncliffe". He was discharged 27 December 1918 in Toronto, "having been found medically unfit".
He died of tuberculosis in Toronto 25 September 1925 and is buried in St. John's Anglican Cemetery, Port Hope. While Alfred's name appears in the Book of Remembrance and on the Cenotaph, nothing was supplied by his family to the Committee.
Alfred's death notice
Evening Guide:26 Sep 1925
No photograph available James Tarrington (59951), the son of James and Jane (Burrows), was born in Taunton, Devonshire, 30 August 1876 (his attestation papers state 1881). He married Lily Lizzette Lake 06 August 1900 in Somerset. In 1907, James, Lily, and their three children emigrated to Canada.
He was working as a bricklayer when he was attested into the 21st Battalion 09 November 1914 in Kingston, sailing from Montreal 06 May 1915. He disembarked in Boulogne, France, 15 September 1915, proceeding to St. Omer.
During his time in France, where his military file indicates his conduct and character as "very good", he seems to have developed a series of ailments, being treated from 04 December 1915 to 21 March 1916 for sciatica, bronchitis, lumbago, myalgia, and rheumatism. As these were not previous complaints, they were attributed to the trench conditions: "Patient was at the front since September, in the trenches a good deal of that time. Trenches full of water and patient was drenched to knees most of time".
James returned to Kingston for his 20 October 1916 discharge from the 21st Battalion as "medically unfit".
He died, age 42, of pneumonia at Toronto's Grace Hospital 20 April 1918, leaving Lily with eight children. On 04 September 1919, Lily died of an embolism. Both are buried in Toronto's Prospect Cemetery. The Tarrington children were reported to have been separated and raised by various family members and friends.
While James' appears in the Book of Remembrance and on the Cenotaph, nothing was supplied by his family to the Committee.
The Tarrington family

James' death notice
Evening Guide: 22 Apr 1918
No photograph available George Edward Turnbull (805077), aka George Edward Hunt, was born March 1899 (07 August 1897 on his attestation papers) in Bournemouth, England, the youngest of four sons of Robert and Margaret (Hall). The family emigrated to St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1911.
George, an unmarried labourer, enlisted under the surname of "Hunt" (also claiming inexplicably that his parents were his aunt and uncle) 05 January 1916 at Port Hope. He arrived in England on the SS Corsican 06 October 1916.
His service records list treatment for a shrapnel wound to his left wrist in April 1917, a trial for being AWOL in May 1918, trench fever and a bout with influenza in June 1918, and a bout with influenza in June 1918. He spent a month with the 182nd Tunnelling Co. before joining the 87th Battalion, Manitoba Regiment of the Canadian Infantry. He was killed in action in France 02 September 1918. He is buried in Dury Mill British Cemetery near Arras, France. His name is also enscribed on the Memorial Park Cenotaph at St. Catharines.
His name appears neither in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Port Hope Cenotaph.
Name change
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada
No photograph available Roland Turner (195329) was born 25 May 1895 in Greater London, England, and at some time prior to 1907 was placed into the Fegan Home. In May of that year, he emigrated as part of a group of boys to the Distributing Centre in Toronto where eventually he would find himself a foster child of William and Annie (Kirkpatrick) McMillan of Elizabethville, Ontario.
Described as a 132 pound, five foot five and a half inch farm laborer with a dark complexion and blue-brown eyes, he enlisted 22 November 1915 in Peterborough, where he was assigned to the 5th Mounted Rifles (Quebec Regiment).
He left Halifax on the Empress of Britain 15 July 1916, arriving in Liverpool 25 July. He was sent to France 08 August with the B Company, 93rd Battalion, and on 30/31 October 1917 was killed in action. There was a memorial service held in Elizabethville in November of that year. As there is no known burial spot for him, his name is inscribed on the Menin Gate, Ypres.
His name is neither in the Book of Remembrance nor on the Cenotaph.
Roland's Will
Image courtesy of Library and Archives Canada

Roland's memorial service
Evening Guide: 21 Nov 1917
Frank with mother, Kate, after receiving the Military Cross from King George V
Courtesy of grandson Paul Waghorn
Francis Thomas George Waghorn (45534), eldest of three children of George Penfold and Kate (Mills), was born 04 April 1893 in New Brompton, Kent, England. It would appear that he arrived in Canada in 1910.
His Record of Service, dated 29 March 1921 in Ottawa, summarizes his wartime career:
"This is to certify that Lieutenant Frank Waghorn, M.C., D.C.M., M.M. & Bar, enlisted in the 1st Motor Machine Gun Brigade as 45534 (Private) on the 22nd day of September, 1914, and was appointed to a Commissioned rank in the Canadian Machine Gun Corps 24-3-18; proceeded to England 1-10-14: landed in France 17-6-15; awarded Military Medal, authority London Gazette No. 29608 dated 3-6-16; Bar to Military Medal, authority London Gazette No. 30172 dated 9-7-17; gassed 18-8-17; left for England 18-12-17; awarded D.C.M. authority London Gazette No. 30555 dated 4-3-18; arrived in France as Lieutenant 3-5-18; gunshot wound both thighs 2-9-18 [at Villers-les-Cagnicourt, machine gun bullet]; awarded Military Cross, authority London Gazette No. 30997 dated 19-11-18; invalided to England 7-10-18; invalided to Canada 8-8-19; discharged 8-12-19 in consequence of Medical Unfitness."
Frank left Canada in 1921, married Constance Muriel King 05 January 1922 in London, and returned to Canada, intending to remain permanently. Records indicate Port Hope residency 1942-the late 1950s. By 1964, he had returned to England. After Constance died in 1965, he married Lillian Foulsham in 1965, and passed away in Lymington, Hampshire, 12 March 1975.
There is a commemorative plaque in St. Mark's Anglican Church in Port Hope.
Frank was not included in the Book of Remembrance.
Newspaper article
Evening Guide: 25 April 2000
George White
Image from 21st Battalion.ca
George Patrick White (60054), son of James, was born 25 August 1896 in Chatham, England. His attestation papers show his next-of-kin as Mrs. Sarah Ferguson of Hagerman Street, Port Hope.
Describing himself as a single farmer, he enlisted with the 21st Battalion 06 November 1914 at Kingston and arrived in France 15 September 1915. He died of bronchopneumonia as a result of influenza and is buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
He is shown in the Book of Remembrance, but is not on the Cenotaph.
George's death notice
Evening Guide: 26 Jan 1916
Pte Wilson, prior to leaving Canada for WWI
Image from The Canadian Virtual War Memorial
William James Wilson (305040), son of James and Eliza Jane (Stoddart), was born 13 April 1890 in Port Hope.
Listing himself as a single farmer with previous military involvement with the 40th Regiment, he enlisted with the 120th City of Hamilton Battalion, Canadian Infantry, 17 September 1915 in Hamilton and sailed for England from Halifax 14 August 1916.
Following a bout of influenza (1916) and two cases of trench fever (1917, 1918), he was killed in action with the 19th Battalion (Central Ontario Regiment) in France 27 August 1918. He is buried in Windmill British Cemetery, Pas-de-Calais.
He is not shown in the Book of Remembrance, but is found on the Cenotaph.
William's death notice
Evening Guide: 12 Sep 1918
William Yates
Evening Guide: 28 Nov 1917
William Lawrence Yates (805317) was born in Perrytown, Ontario, the son of Rowland Charles and Alvina Jane (Hearns), 17 July 1894. On 07 February 1916, he enlisted with the 136th Battalion in Port Hope. He sailed to England 25 September. An acting Corporal, he requested he be made a private so that he could be sent to France.
On 16 June 1917, he arrived at Etaples, joining the 21st Battalion. A day after moving into the front lines at Passchendaele, he took shrapnel wounds to his abdomen and died at the No. 44 Casualty Clearing Station 04 November 1917. He is buried in Nine Elms British Cemetery, Belgium.
While his name appears in the Book of Remembrance and on the Cenotaph, nothing was supplied by his family to the Committee.
Lawrence Yates' death notice
Evening Guide: 28 Nov 1917

Peter and Barbara Bolton - Port Hope, Ontario
www.alivingpast.ca