The 1842 Voyage of the Blenheim:
Plymouth, England, to New Plymouth, New Zealand

This journal, kept by Samuel Norway, Surgeon Superintendent on the Blenheim, was transcribed from the microfilmed original records of the New Zealand Company by the late Mary Richardson, a great-granddaughter of passengers Josiah and Susannah (Beaglehole) Millstead. Our thanks to Dawn Dare (dare@vicnet.net.au), Mary's sister, for allowing us to present these journal extracts.

Information regarding the history of the Blenheim can be found on Hugh McPhail's most informative site.


Friday 1st July 1842: Embarked the steerage emigrants at 10 o'clock. All appear to be in good health except Jane Lee who appears to be consumptive and pregnant. Thomas Langman, aged 4 years, who has slight diarrhoea.

Saturday 2nd July 1842: Sailed this morning at six o'clock. Fresh breeze with a heavy head sea which soon made every person seasick. Ordered 12 pints of porter for the women giving sucks.

Sunday 3rd July 1842: Strong breezes with a heavy roll. The ship pitched and rolled so much it kept the emigrants constantly sick. No divine service performed at all. The people too unwell to attend. Mustered all the people who could attend.

Monday 4th July 1842: A heavy gale of wind from the southward and westward accompanied by heavy head seas with occasional heavy rain. The emigrants and passengers all very seasick - the ship rolled heavily. James Pierce fell out of the rigging but escaped with a slight bruise in the lumber region. William Mitchell, a sailor, fell overboard and was lost from the fore top-yard and Sam Lauvier was placed in irons for refusing to obey the Captain's orders. He was allowed out in the morning on promising future good behaviour. They were all drunk from grog given to them by four of the intermediate passengers. The main yard and canvasses away about 4p.m. The emigrants were upset by the rolling of the ship and the breaking of bottles. The medicine chest was upset by the rolling of the ship and the bottles broken. 1 cask of pork and 1 cask of beef opened and found to be good.

Tuesday 5th July 1842: The ship rolled very much all night and made it very uncomfortable for every person on board. The gales subsided towards the evening and the people largely recovered from their seasickness. Three of the women having suffered severely during the night. The rolling of the ship upset the stores belonging to the emigrants preventing them from having boiling water for their breakfast. The cook and the cook's mate resigned on Monday and Richard Goniman and Edward George were appointed in their place. Today the last of the fresh meat and soft bread issued.

Wednesday 6th July 1842: A beautiful day. The emigrants free from seasickness. The carpenter provided more ventilation for the berths. Elizabeth Williams - diarrhoea. Hoisted the main yard this morning. The people on deck all day. Three berths visited and inspected by the M. of A.

Thursday 7th July 1842: Very squally during the night. Strong winds in the morning. Most of the emigrants sick again. Some of the emigrants complained of constipation of the bowels after their seasickness. Scattered chloride of lime through the berths, berths cleaned and inspected by the M. of A.

Friday 8th July 1842: Blew hard during the night. The ship pitched heavily. Raining with a heavy squall in the morning. Vaccinated William Holloway's infant, Rosemary. Gave out purgative medicine for constipation. Ordered a pint of grits for Langman's children. Divided the men into watches for the cleaning of decks and the berths. A large steamer passed home-ward bound from the West Indies or America. The people on deck for a short time. The berths cleaned and inspected by M of A.

Saturday 9th July 1842: Winds moderate - sea much calmer. The people recovering from their seasickness. In the afternoon kept the people dancing and jumping. William Richard distributed flour. He complained of his allowance although it weighted a full pound. He forfeited his allowance for his impertinent language to the chief mate. Mr. Spry ordered his flour to be kept back. The people washed the decks by 7am. The berths cleaned and ventilated.

Sunday 10th July 1842: Winds moderate. Mustered the people and examined them. William Williams very impertinent to the Captain about examining the people. Served the flour out to William Richard this morning but was sorry that I did for his impertinence couched to the Captain afterwards. Read prayers and a service this morning. The berths cleaned and ventilated. The decks washed.

Monday 11th July 1842: Heavy squalls during the night. Very squally during the morning. Carried away the top sails yard about 7pm. I served to the emigrants all their provisions except meat and bread for the week at their request as they fancy they will use them according to their particular desires. We have had contrary winds all day and every one can take but little advantage of fair winds. Ordered a pound of grits for Langman's children and a pound for Mrs. Holloway who appears weakened from seasickness. Chloride of Lime scattered over the berths. The berths cleaned and ventilated. 1 cask of pork and 1 cask of beef opened and found to be good.

Tuesday 12th July 1842: Winds moderate. Shipped in sea through the scuttle of the hospital which was unsettled a great many things in the medicine chest. Signalled a ship but could not understand his signals. No bedding up on deck this day because of the heavy sea and the spray constantly coming on board. The berths cleaned and ventilated. The people on deck all day.

Wednesday 13th July 1842: Light winds. No sickness. Packer received a wound in the head over the occipital region from a heavy bucket falling on it. ? and Coleman have desired that their rations of salt pork not be served out. The bedding on deck for the full time. The weather permitted it. Main top galant yard broken in a light breeze. Mr. James Smart, one of the passengers, interfered with John Hurford and ordered him not to clean the deck and his berth and was obliged to exercise authority.

Saturday 16th July 1842: Slight fair winds - smooth seas. People well. Bedding on deck. Ordered Mrs. Lee two pints of grits and one ounce of arowroot and stopped her beef and pork. In the afternoon and evening kept the people jumping and dancing. John Hughes refused to join them in an impertinent manner and said he would not do as ordered for which conduct I confined him and intended to do so on bread and water - with which he asked my pardon for his condition but the Captain has confined him for about an hour. Mr. Smart, who wanted his hands tied, with Mr. Pridie interfered about it with the Captain and both were very impertinent in their observations.

Sunday 17th July 1842: Slight fair winds. Read prayers. The bedding on deck. Four people sick with diarrhoea. I was obliged to order William Collins to wash his two children twice today. A small turtle along side. Madeira in sight. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed.

Monday 18th July 1842: Light fair wind. Made little progress. Madeira still in sight. No fresh sickness. Chloride of Lime sprinkled through the berths. Ordered William Collins, his wife and children to have their hair cut close on account of the amount of vermin. Ordered Colimol to be rubbed into them. Young Baker and Williams quarreled, interferred in the fighting and ordered a separation. Ordered that Baker join his parents.

Tuesday 19th July 1842: Fair wind. No fresh sickness. Bedding on deck. People rather inclined to be riotous but it was settled without interference on my part. School opened for the first time. It had not been done before because the children and the parents had not been fully recovered from their seasickness.

Wednesday 20th July 1842: Light winds. No fresh cases of sickness. Mary Argle very impertinent this morning about sitting. She told me she would get up when she liked and that she would pay no attention to what I said. Bedding on deck. James Williams was beating his wife severely and was very riotous afterwards. Would not obey the orders to the Captain. Was obliged to lash his arms and confine him to the poop. It was about 6pm. After confining him for about two hours he promised good behaviour in future and was then liberated. He has caused more trouble on board than all the others put together. School open. One fresh case of sickness. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed.

Thursday 21st July 1842: Fair wind, sea light. The Captain has considered we have caught the trades. The people quiet and orderly. One fresh case of sickness - Millstead. The people saw a flying fish for the first time. Chloride of Lime scattered through the berths. Berths cleaned. Decks washed.

Friday 22nd July 1842: Almost becalmed. One fresh case of sickness. Helen Julian, aged 24, was hysterical and brought around by continually throwing water over her head and face. Was obliged to speak to the young women about their words at night annoying the intermediate passengers. Decks cleaned. Bedding aired. Berths cleaned and ventilated.

Saturday 23rd July 1842: Fair breeze - very hot. No fresh cases of sickness. *Morris, the boatswain and some of the other sailors were absent from their watch and would not obey the orders of the chief mate who complained in the morning to the Captain who after breakfast made a search and found 6 bottles of port in the boatswain's chest and a bottle of whiskey in the chest of Sam Lauvier and a bottle of hock in the chest of boy?..... The Captain ordered the boatswain to prison in the poop. He refused to go and when told that if he did not go willingly he would be forced. He drew his knife on the Captain and threatened his life. He went at last after giving up his knife but on his way seized the carpenter's saw and again threatened the life of the Captain or any other man who followed him. After some time he went on the poop and threw down his weapons viz; the saw and hand pike. He then suffered himself to be ironed. He was then for flinging himself overboard. He was then handcuffed or rather his hands were ironed. *Morris Molonier - he is an Irishman.

Sunday 24th July 1842: Fair breeze. Ship going along. Read prayers, inspected the people. The people on deck all day. The decks washed. The berths cleaned and inspected by M. of A. Part of a bottle of port found in Morris's, part of a bottle of whiskey in Lauvier's and part of a bottle of hock in boy ?

Monday 25th July 1842: Fair breeze - one new case of sickness. Chloride of Lime sprinkled through the berths. Was obliged to threaten Millstead with a pail of salt water if he did not turn out of bed directly, it had the desired effect. The decks washed by 7am. The berths cleaned and ventilated.

Tuesday 26th July 1842: Fair breeze - no sickness. Bedding on deck. Signalled the Barque Stork from Downs to the Good Hope - out 28 days. The young women complained that some the intermediate passengers threw water into their berths which wetted all their clothes and sprinkled them in their beds. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck all day.

Wednesday 27th July 1842: Fine day. Spoke the Barque Christopher Rawston from Portsmouth to China - out 31 days. Obtained a spar from her to make a main top-gallant which was sprung the 13th inst. Bedding on deck. One new case of sickness. Mary Langman. The decks washed. The people on deck all day.

Thursday 28th July 1842: Fine Breeze - bedding on deck. No new cases of sickness. Squally during the morning. The bedding taken below on account of the rain. Collin's infant scalded accidently - not severely. The berths cleaned and decks washed by a quarter past 10.

Friday 29th July 1842: Heavy rain during the night and day. Kept the people below under the hatches. They suffered a good deal from the heat. Caught a couple of sharks which were given to the emigrants. No fresh cases of sickness. Ordered Lime joice for Mrs. Langman. The decks not washed and the berths kept as clean as possible.

Saturday 30th July 1842: A strong breeze. Bedding on deck. Caught a porpoise this morning and gave it to the people. No fresh cases of sickness. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck all day.

Sunday 31st July 1842: Very heavy rain during the night. The people battened down. No new sickness. Said prayers. Inspected the people. Signalled the ship Duncan for the second time. All well. The people on deck all day. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed.

Monday 1st August 1842: Very squally with heavy rain. Carried away the mizzen ? hook in the squall this morning. No new sickness. The people below deck all day. The berths kept as clean as possible.

Wednesday 3rd August 1842: Fine weather. No bedding on deck as there was a heavy sea running and continuously breaking over the ship. The people on deck as much as possible. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime scattered through the berths. A ship in sight homeward bound. Engaged in preparing letters for Mr. Ward of London and for M.W. Bayden of Plymouth. No sickness. Wind very contrary. A pig was either thrown overboard or killed last night by some of the crew.

Saturday 6th August 1842: Fine weather. Bedding on deck. No sickness. Three ships in sight. Gave an order for extra pint of porter that the women all complain is too acid for them................

Sunday 7th August 1842: Strong winds and cloudy weather. Bedding below. Ordered Richard's child one ounce of arowroot who has diarrhoea. Said prayers. Re-vaccinated Rosalie Holloway......

Wednesday 10th August 1842: Fine weather - strong breezes and more in our favour. Jane Lees was sent to the hospital being in labour. Ordered her one quart of oatmeal, one ounce of lime juice and half a gill of brandy. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck.

Thursday 11th August 1842: Fine weather. Fair wind. Crossed the Equator today. Neptune made his appearance on board and as per formula of shaving the hair of those that had never passed the equator before. All the male passengers bowed to his sway. Some of the emigrants joined in but others made such a great noise about it and refused to pass the ordeal. No bedding on deck - an amount of water being constantly thrown about during the games. Ordered an ounce of Lime Juice for Jane Lee. Spoke the ship Pembroke, Captain Tate from New London, United States, out 50 days - bound for the South Seas whaling. She sent us on board some potatoes and onions.

Friday 12th August 1842: Fine weather - fair breeze. The Barque Pembroke in sight. Jane Lee brought to birth of a girl. Captain Tate of the Pembroke came aboard with two gowns for Jane Lee. Ordered Lime Juice for Jane Lee. Mrs. Lee's child very small and weak. Not likely to live many days. Bedding on deck. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Sent letter to England by the Pembroke to Mr. Ward and Mr. Bridges.

Sunday 14th August 1842: Fine weather, fair breeze. French whaler in sight. Said prayers. Mustered the emigrants. Made a complaint to the Captain of the observation made last evening in the Cabin by Mr. Knight who accused me of stealing the saddle of mutton which was lost on Tuesday evening last. The Captain of the Frenchman came aboard. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck.

Monday 15th August 1842: Fine weather and strong breezes. Chloride of Lime scattered through the berths. No new cases of sickness. Bedding on deck. Berths cleaned and ventilated. The Captain has taken, as yet, no notice of my complaint against Mr. Knight. 1 cask of pork and 1 cask of beef opened and found good.

Saturday 20th August 1842: Fine weather and calm with a variable wind. Bedding on deck. Emigrants on deck. The Island of Trinidad in sight on the weather bows.

Sunday 21st August 1842: Light breezes and fair weather. Bedding on deck. Said prayers. Emigrants all well. Ordered Jane Lee and child one ounce of arowroot. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed.

Tuesday 23rd August 1842: Light winds and clear weather. Bedding on deck. Emigrants all well. The infant of Mrs. Lee had a slight convulsion. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed.........

Wednesday 24th August 1842: Light winds and clear weather. Bedding on deck. Three new cases of sickness amongst the emigrants. Mrs. Lee's infant going very fast - refused to take any food and will not suck. Mrs. Holloway who has been kindly sucking it for several days past. Some water having escaped from the water closet of the young women's berth wetting their berths. I ordered Elizabeth Baker, Eliza and Francis Rogers, Eleanor and Caroline Julian to clean it up which they refused to do. I locked them up and kept them there without dinner until it was done. They did not clean it up until near dark. The carpenter stopped the leak, he could not do it before - it was too wet. Mrs. Lee's infant died in the afternoon and was committed to the sea.

Saturday 27th August 1842: Strong winds and cloudy weather. Bedding on deck. three sails in sight. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck. 1 cask of beef and 2 casks of pork opened and found good.

Sunday 28th August 1842: Strong winds and fine weather. Bedding on deck. At 6am carried away our top main gallant and royal mast. Set the new main top gallant and royal by 10am and set sail again. Prayers read. Mrs. Moon was delivered of a daughter this morning after a very easy and quick labour. Mrs. Lee better. No new cases of sickness. A French barque in sight. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. People on deck.

Tuesday 30th August 1842: Strong breezes and fair weather. Bedding on deck. No further cases of sickness. The young women complained this morning of some of the intermediate passengers last night having broken down some of the board between their berths but would not tell who did it on which the Captain ordered them all to be locked up and kept on bread and water until they told who did it. Mrs. Lee better and Mrs. Moon going along well. The girls who complained were - Eleanor and Caroline Julian, Charlotte Wilkinson, Elizabeth Pain, Anny Sketch, Elizabeth Baker, Francis Rogers and Eliza Rogers. The Captain took them out about 1 o'clock.

Sunday 4th September 1842: Strong winds and heavy sea. No bedding on deck. Emigrants all well. No prayers on account of the sea breaking over the decks. Ordered preserved meat and Lime Joice for Mrs. Lee and Mrs. Moon. Chloride of Lime used. Berths kept as clean as possible.

Tuesday 6th September 1842: Fine clear weather but rather cold. Bedding on deck. Chloride of Lime used. Emigrants all well. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. The Captain ordered Ms. Knight, Mrs. & Mrs. Walsh, Mrs. Johnstone, Mrs. Cillman to be served their rations and not to appear again at the cuddy table before 19th September.

Thursday 8th September 1842: Blew very heavy all night - the ship labouring very much. Shipped several beavy seas. The dead lights were shipped. The fore-top stay was split about 2 o'clock am and about 4 o'clock am carried away the block of the main top sail sheet. Blew very hard all day with a very high sea. Ship labouring very much with the decks constantly covered by the seas. The hatches battened down. The emigrants all well. Chloride of Lime scattered through the berths.

Friday 9th September 1842: Blew very hard during the night and the ship rolled very much. About 9 o'clock pm a heavy sea struck us astern. Threw the man at the wheel into the scuppers, knocked in one of the dead lights in the starboard cabins and washed the passengers out of their berths and flooded the cabins. The wind and sea moderated towards morning. The emigrants all well though battened down for three days. No muster. Chloride of Lime scattered through berths. The Captain's barometer was injured during the gales.

Saturday 10th September 1842: Fell in cabin during the night, a long heavy roll. Fine weather. Emigrants out on deck, all people engaged in drying their clothes. Clothes a little injured by the salt in them. The berths all made dry and cleaned. No cases of sickness.

Sunday 11th September 1842: Light wind with slight occasional showers with clear weather in between. Bedding on deck part of the day. Said prayers. Mustered the people - John Lee did not attend and when William Shell was sent a second time for him he gave him very abusive language and said that Shell was a bloody liar. The Captain ordered Lee on the poop on which he muttered words to me I could not hear. He laughed at the Captain when the Captain caught up a rope's end and struck him a blow or two with it. He was confined on the poop until 4 o'clock pm without his dinner.

Thursday 15th September 1842: A calm very fine day. Emigrants all well. Spoke the Mary and Halgarten from Amsterdam to Batavia. Decks washed by 7am.

Friday 16th September 1842: Fine fair breeze. Rather cloudy with slight showers. Emigrants all well. Bedding not on deck. Spoke the Prince George from Halifax, Nova Scotia to China. The people below. Berths cleaned and ventilated.

Sunday 18th September 1842: Fair breeze - fine weather. Emigrants well. Said prayers. Mustered the people. About 2 o'clock pm carried away our top mast studding and boom. Bedding on deck. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed. Chloride of Lime scattered through berths.

Wednesday 28th September 1842: Strong gales. Ship under close reef sails. Heavy showers of hail and sleet. The people battened down. Emigrants all well. Berths kept as clean as possible.

Thursday 29th September 1842: A strong gale with a very hevy sea. Split the fore top mast stay about 8am. Heavy showers of sleet and hail. The emigrants all below and well.

Wednesday 5th October 1842: Light wind and clear cold weather. The emigrants all well and on deck. Chloride of Lime scattered through berths. Richard Goninan, the cook, was impertinent to the Captain on which he stopped his provisions for a week. Marjorie Baird complained that some of the intermediate passengers and drawn her stays and petticoat through the board and had broken the bones through the cloth and rent her petticoat. I could not find out who did it. I spoke to the Captain about it. Berths cleaned and ventilated.

Thursday 6th October 1842: Strong winds and cloudy wet weather. No bedding on deck. Emigrants all well. Josiah Millstead was accused of stealing a spoon from Mrs. Vernon which was found in his possession. His boxes were searched and a cotton handkerchief was found in his possession belonging to William Coleman, which was restored to him and a knife which was also claimed by him, Mr. Coleman but which I retained there appearing to be doubt about the knife. The people below decks all day. Decks washed by 7am. Berths cleaned by 11am. 1 cask of pork, 1 cask of beef opened and found very good.

Friday 7th October 1842: A strong gale with a fine clear day. Shipped some heavy seas during the night. People below - berths kept as clean as possible. No bedding on deck. The people battened down. The decks not washed.

Sunday 9th October 1842: Strong breezes with occasional showers. No prayers said. The emigrants all well. The people on deck between showers. Decks cleaned by 7am. Berths cleaned and ventilated by 11am. Chloride of Lime used. The bedding not on deck. The Captain ordered Richard Goninan to have his rations again.

Monday 10th October 1842: Strong breeze with clear weather. The emigrants all well. The people on deck. The berths cleaned. Chloride of Lime used. No bedding on deck. About 11pm Josiah Millstead was beating his wife who cried out. I went down and confined him in the hospital for the night and this morning on inquiring into the affair confined him to the hospital for a week and his wife to be at liberty but to have all her rations stopped except bread and water with the approbation of the Captain.

Wednesday 12th October 1842: Heavy squalls with showers of hail and sleet. Mrs. Lee has an indolent abscess forming in her breast. The rest of the emigrants well. The people on deck between showers. No bedding on deck. Mustered the people..........

Thursday 13th October 1842: Heavy gale of wind with a heavy sea. Split the main sail and main top sail bout 2 o'clock am. The emigrants all well except Mrs. Lee. They were battened down. The berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. No bedding on deck. 1 cask of Beef, 1 cask of port opened and found good.

Sunday 16th October 1842: Strong breeze with clear weather. Mrs. Lee and Mrs. Richard unwell - the rest of the emigrants well. No bedding on deck as there was a heavy sea and rolling. The decks washed by 7am. Berths cleaned and ventilated by half past 12. Josiah Millstead liberated and allowed his rations.

Wednesday 19th October 1842: Heavy squalls accompanied by hail. James Williams ill, Mrs. Lee better. The remainder of the emigrants well. No bedding on deck. Emigrants on deck between showers. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used.

Thursday 20th October 1842: Light winds and cloudy wet weather. Made King Island, Bass Strait about 4am. Mrs. Lee a little better. James Williams the same. The remainder of the emigrants well. No bedding on deck. The emigrants on deck at times. Berths cleaned and ventilated by 11am. Made Wilson's Promontory towards evening. Lay to during the night. The cook ordered on the poop as a prisoner for being drunk.

Friday 21st October 1842: Strong breeze and clear weather. Made sail at 4 o'clock am. Made Krist's Island about noon. Mrs. Lee and James Williams better. The rest of the emigrants well. No bedding on deck on account of the sea breaking over. The people on deck. Chloride of Lime used. Ordered oatmeal and arowroot for Mrs. Lee. Two ships in sight. Cleared Bass Strait 7am. There were about a dozen Barracouta fish caught today by some of the passengers.

Tuesday 25th October 1842: Moderate winds and fair weather. The sick better. Decks washed by 7am. Berths cleaned and ventilated by 11am. People on deck and mustered. Vaccinated Mrs. Moon's infant. Ordered one quart of oatmeal for Mrs. Coleman.

Saturday 29th October 1842: Strong squalls with clear weather. The sick improving. Slight signs of scurvy in Mrs. Collins and Mrs. Wilkinson. People on deck between showers. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. Made the Southern Island of New Zealand about Cape Foulwind this morning.

Sunday 30th October 1842: Fair breeze and fine weather. The sick better. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Bedding on deck. People on deck. Read prayers and a sermon. Re-vaccinated Mrs. Moon's infant. Made the entrance of Cook's Strait this morning.

Monday 31st October 1842: Light fair winds and clear weather. The sick improving. Decks washed. Bedding on deck. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. People on deck. Off the Taranaki coast with Mt. Egmont in view, could not bring up the straits for the foul weather. The symptoms of scurvy have disappeared. Probably I was mistaken in the first instance. 1 cask of beef and 1 cask of port opened and found to be very good.

Wednesday 2nd November 1842: Fresh wind and clear weather. Mrs. Williams confined of a girl - very small. The sick better. The decks washed by 7am. Berths cleaned and ventilated by 11 am. Chloride of Lime used. Bedding on deck. People on deck. Came to anchor at the entrance of Port Nicholson, the winds failed and could not work up against the tide.

Thursday 3rd November 1842: We sailed into Wellington today and came to anchor about 3pm. The sick better. The bedding on deck. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used.

Friday 4th November 1842: Fine weather. Mrs. Hurford confined of a fine girl. The sick getting better. Decks washed by 7am. Berths cleaned and ventilated by 1am. Bedding on deck. Chloride of Lime used. People on deck. Fresh meat, pork, issued to the emigrants. Mr. Ruddaford, the emigration agent came aboard and gave Marion Baird liberty to remain at Wellington with Mr. Knight: and Mr. Killon, acting for Colonel Wakefield, was on board.

Saturday 5th November 1842: Fair weather. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Fresh meat issued to the people.

Sunday 6th November 1842: Fair weather. The sick doing well. The berths cleaned and ventilated. Decks washed. Chloride of Lime used. Fresh pork issued. The Revd. Mr. Calt came aboard and performed divine service at 5pm. and the Revd. John Alders, a Wesleyan Missionary, preached a sermon in the evening at about 7pm. Confined Philip Moon from 2pm - 7 o'clock for speaking very impertinently to Mr. Tyack, first mate.

Monday 7th November 1842: Squally weather. The sick going well. The berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. Decks washed. The people on deck. Some fresh meat for the emigrants, the remainder preserved meat. The emigrants refused today the fresh meat and preserved meat as there was not sufficient fresh pork for all of them. They had not received their water but which I obtained for them as soon as I knew of it. They told me that Knight interfered and I explained to them I would put everything right as soon as the Captain returned on board. No flour issued.

Tuesday 8th November 1842: Fair weather. The sick doing well. Discharging cargo. The beds below. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Fresh meat for the emigrants. No flour issued. West ashore to attend the trial of Morris Molonier as witness against him. He was convicted and sentenced to two months hard labour. The porter for the emigrant women finished today.

Wednesday 9th November 1842: Blew very hard during the night. Obliged to let go of the second anchor and during the day could have no communications with the shore. Beds below. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used.

Thursday 10th November 1842: During the night alarmed by a tremendous fire ashore. Could observe that a great number of houses were in flames but could not send a boat as it was blowing very hard and we were in danger of going aground. A fine day. Beds below account of discharging cargo. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. Decks washed. People on deck. Received in the evening dispatches from Colonel Wakefield's office for New Plymouth. Salt port and biscuits only issued.

Friday 11th November 1842: Squally winds and clear weather. Discharging cargo and preparing for sea. Decks washed. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Biscuit and fresh pork issued.

Saturday 12th November 1842: Fine weather and moderate winds. Taking in cargo. Decks washed. Beds below. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Ann Sketch disordered bowels from change of food. The sick better. Biscuits, fresh pork and potatoes issued.

Sunday 13th November 1842: Blowing hard - fine weather. Ready to go to sea. The sick better. Biscuits, fresh pork and potatoes. Sugar for the sick. Blowing too hard to read prayers.

Monday 14th November 1842: Blowing very hard, cannot go to sea. Berths cleaned and ventilated. Chloride of Lime used. The beds below on account of expecting to go to sea any moment. Sailed this evening about 4pm.

At 4a.m. on the 17th Mt. Egmont was sighted to the N.W. and on Sunday 20th "hove to off New Plymouth for a boat from shore". The Port Master Captain King, and the Collector of Customs, Mr. Webster went on board and commenced the landing of passengers and luggage. It was reported that the Blenheim did not come to anchor as the Captain was afraid of his crew leaving him. Captain Gray's problems with the crew throughout the voyage appear to have been mainly caused by liquor. On November 27th the ship's carpenter and two others were removed from the vessel and locked up.


Peter and Barbara Bolton - Port Hope, Ontario
www.alivingpast.ca